Fibromyalgia Self-Care Workbook

Free download of my Fibro Ebook

I am a complementary energy healing therapist.  Since 2005 I have studied various healing modalities and have used my knowledge to devise specific treatments using various techniques from my training to give the best treatment to myclients.

My interest in this specific treatment is due to my close family relation having been diagnosed in 2007 with fibromyalgia.

Itec Massage/Sports Massage, Itec Reflexology advanced,  Master Reiki practitioner, Indian Head Massage, Hopi Ear Candle, Hot Stones, Master Herbalist.

Menu

  • How They Diagnose Fibromyalgia
  • Some of the Medication you may be on
  • Your Individual Fibromyalgia Story
  • What is functional medicine
  • Fibromyalgia Natural Treatments Address the Root
  • Functional Medicine – What to do and what to get checked
  • Rest
  • Rebalance
  • Restore
  • Fibromyalgia Diet Considerations
  • Meditation
  • Adrenals
  • Conclusion

Free to download is my Fibromyalgia SelfCare Ebook.

Fibromyalgia Self Care – Diet/Allergens/Deficiencies

Fibromyalgia Self Care – Diet/Allergens/Deficiencies

  1. Eat a whole food, anti-inflammatory diet.  Include 8 to 12 servings of fresh vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts, seeds and whole grains every day.  
  • Focus on anti-inflammatory foods including wild fish and other sources of omega-3 fats are flaxseeds and omega-3 eggs, red and purple berries (these are rich in polyphenols); dark green leafy vegetables; orange sweet potatoes; and nuts.
  •  Add anti-inflammatory herbs, including turmeric (a source of curcumin), ginger and rosemary, to your daily diet. Eliminate inflammatory foods such as refined, omega-6 and inflammatory oils, including corn, soy and safflower oils.
  • Check for hidden infections. These include yeast, viruses, bacteria and Lyme.
  • Check for hidden food allergies.  You can go to your doctor or you can get these done online.  Also work with a doctor to look for nutritional deficiencies such as low vitamin D.
  • Test for heavy metal toxicity. Mercury and other metals can cause autoimmunity.
  • Fix your gut. About 60 percent of your immune system lies right under the single-cell-layer lining of your gut. If this surface breaks down, your immune system will get activated and start reacting to foods, toxins and the good bugs in your gut. The easiest way to begin healing your gut involves eating a whole food, anti-inflammatory diet (see tip 1 above) and removing gluten and other foods that cause sensitivities – including corn, dairy, soy.
  • Exercise regularly. Regular exercise is a natural anti-inflammatory. You don’t have to go to the gym, run on a treadmill and pump iron to stay in shape. Just start moving around more. Go for walks with your friends or family. Go out and do some gardening. Play Frisbee in the park with your kids.  Anything you can do to get out and move your body can be considered exercise.
  • Practice deep relaxation. Stress amps up your immune system response. Incorporate calming techniques, such as yoga, deep breathing, biofeedback, or massage, daily to relax.
  • Sleep for 8 hours every night. The research is clear: Lack of sleep, or even poor-quality sleep damages your metabolism, causes cravings for sugar and carbs, makes you eat more and drives up your risk of numerous conditions from diabetes to autoimmune disease. Getting enough sleep and sleeping well are essential for vibrant health and reversing inflammation.
  • Avoid drugs: Almost all of us use drugs every day to manage our energy. These include sugar, caffeine, alcohol and more. Think about taking a “drug holiday” for six weeks and see how much better you feel.
  • Remember feeling well: When I get off track, I simply remember what it is like to feel great and what I must do to get there — eat better, sleep more, exercise more, or do nothing more!

Can Massage Help with Fibromyalgia

Can Massage Treatments Help Fibromyalgia

Firstly – What is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia can be a diagnostic challenge. Fibromyalgia is medically classified as a “syndrome”, meaning it is a group of traits, signs and symptoms that occur simultaneously. Fibromyalgia symptoms vary widely from person to person, and the following is a list of possible symptoms.

  • Widespread Pain
  • Headaches
  • Painful” Tender Points”
  • Muscle Soreness
  • General Fatigue
  • Limited Tolerance to Activity
  • Trouble Concentrating
  • Anxiety
  • Disrupted Sleep
  • Digestive Problems

Can Massage Help?

A recent consumer survey, commissioned by The American Message Therapy Association (AMTA), found that 91 percent of survey respondents agreed that massage can be effective in reducing pain, and nearly half of those polled (47 percent) have had a massage specifically for the purpose of relieving pain. Massage can directly reduce muscle soreness, by cleansing muscle tissues of metabolic wastes. The application of heat help calm pain for most fibromyalgia sufferers. I tend to use an infra red sauna blanket within my treatments.

Testimonials from Massage Clients

“Before weekly massages, my muscles never knew what relaxed was. I still involuntarily tighten my muscles, but I have less pain. Now that I know what relaxed muscles feel like, I can monitor my muscles to un-tighten them.”

“The change in my body after seven months of routine massage was tremendous. My headaches are less frequent, and I take less medication than I have in years.”

“I utilize massage as a preventative therapy. By seeking help with painful areas before they become unmanageable, I’m able to keep on top of the most painful flares. I also find that when I am over-stressed, massage is a very helpful leveler.”

Having Fibromyalgia and dealing with the pain and limitations also creates a lot of mental stress. Massage can provide great relief from stress and offer a chance for someone to take charge and provide necessary self-care. Research shows that Massage can help the body achieve deeper sleep and sleep quality . During Phase IV sleep, the body’s repair mechanisms go to work, and can improve inflammation responses, digestion and cognition and emotional stability. And who doesn’t feel better after a particularly good night of rest?

What should I know before I get a massage?

Massage can help, but it can also hurt. Everyone responds differently to massage. Some people get great relief from massage with deep pressure. However, others wind up sorer after a really firm massage than they were before. This is because for some people, Deep pressure creates inflammation. It is not uncommon to be a little bit sore for 24 hours after a massage, but if you are a lot sore, or if it lasts for longer than one day, you need to tell your therapist to ease up next time. Trust that you know your body better than anyone else, and if you don’t like something, it’s probably not good for you.

When you come to me for a treatment it is very important to always speak to me during the treatment so I know what pressure is working for you and what isn’t.  There is time for a silent energy healing session at the end of the bodywork treatment to help balance the energies and nervous system.

18 Points Used to Diagnose Fibromyalgia

18 Points Used to Diagnose Fibromyalgia

If you have been diagnosed woth fibromyalgia you may notice pain in these areas.

back-neck-pain-fibro

Back of the neck

If you have fibromyalgia, you may have tender points at the back of the neck, where the base of the skull and the neck meet. Neck pain can also be caused by injuries, rheumatoid arthritis, or activities that strain the neck, like slouching or sleeping in an uncomfortable position.

elbow-pain-fibromyalgia

Elbows

Fibromyalgia patients may also feel tenderness on their forearms, near the crease of each elbow. The pain tends to be below the crease and toward the outer side of the arm. Other causes of elbow pain can include tendonitis or repetitive strain injuries.

neck-pain-fibromyalgia

Front of the neck

In addition to the back of the neck, doctors will check potential fibromyalgia patients for pain at the front of the neck. This pair of trigger points is located well above the collarbone, on either side of the larynx. 

hip-pain-fibromyalgia

Hips

Hip pain is common in those with osteoarthritis, but people with arthritis tend to feel it in the joint. In contrast, people with fibromyalgia may have a tender point near where the buttock muscles curve to join the thighs. 

low-back-pain-fibromyalgia

Lower back

The lower back is one of the most common body parts to be the source of pain. Overall, more than 1 in 4 U.S. adults has experienced low back pain. However, people with fibromyalgia may have pain trigger points at the very top of the buttocks, right at the bottom of the lower back. 

knee-pain-fibromyalgia

Knees

While knee trouble is common in people with fibromyalgia, the inside of each knee pad may feel tender touch

shoulder-blade-pain-fibro

Upper back

Tender points are often sites on the body where tendons and muscles meet. Such is the case for this pair of tender points, located where the back muscles connect to the shoulder blades in the upper back.

trapezius-pain-fibromyalgia

Shoulders

In addition to tenderness in the upper back, some people with fibromyalgia have tender points just above that, halfway between the edge of the shoulder and the bottom of the back.

sternum-pain-fibromyalgia

Chest

People with fibromyalgia may have tender points on either side of the sternum, a few inches below the collarbone (near the second rib). The sternum, also known as the breastbone, helps protect the heart and lungs. 

Holistic therapies are an amazing ways to help ease the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Mindfulness meditation dna healthy diet.


Fibromyalgia and Food

The Connection Between Fibromyalgia & Food

It is commonly accepted, and scientifically proven, that a healthy diet can have a positive effect on overall health. Similarly, what you eat can play a role in how you experience fibromyalgia—possibly triggering flare-ups and/or providing relief. Diet, therefore, is often discussed along with other non-pharmacologic (non-medication) treatments for fibromyalgia.

Although there is no specific diet for all fibromyalgia sufferers, it has been shown that vegetarian diets tend to help fibromyalgia. Researches suspect that this is because such diets are low in fat and protein, and high in fibre, beta carotene, vitamin C, and minerals and antioxidants.

Fibromyalgia Nutritional Research

The following provides an overview of recent research into nutrients that may be beneficial additions to a fibromyalgia diet:

  • Antioxidants as part of a diet to help fibromyalgia: Antioxidants are molecules that stop oxidation (a chemical reaction that can produce something called free radicals that can damage cells). The body’s antioxidant system provides defense to keep these free radicals in check. Dietary antioxidants help our bodies to maintain our antioxidant systems. Examples of antioxidants are vitamins C, A, E, and melatonin to name a few. There may be a relationship between higher oxidation and the occurrence of fibromyalgia symptoms, but further research is needed in this area.
  • Ferritin and iron as part of a fibromyalgia diet: There has been research into a possible connection between fibromyalgia symptoms and low blood levels of iron and ferritin (the storage form of iron). Iron is important in the formation of serotonin and dopamine, chemicals in the brain that are involved in pain perception. However, there is no evidence at this time that iron supplementation would help in the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms.
  • Amino acids in the fibromyalgia diet: Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and make up a large part of human muscles and cells. There has been some research showing that patients with fibromyalgia seem to have lower levels of certain amino acids in their blood.
  • Coenzyme Q10 as part of a diet to help fibromyalgia: Coenzyme Q10 is an antioxidant (see above) that is important for cell function. There is some evidence that including coenzyme Q10 in the diet may improve fibromyalgia symptoms.

Fibromyalgia Diet Food List

Fibromyalgia sufferers should eat a diet that’s high in lean protein and fibre, and lower in carbohydrates. Foods that help fibromyalgia include fruits with a low glycaemic index, vegetables and whole grains. A well-balanced diet can improve energy level and staying physically active can lead to better overall health.

The lists below provide examples of the types of foods that may help fibromyalgia symptoms. However, as people with fibromyalgia often have food sensitivities, what relieves symptoms in one person may trigger a flare-up in others. It’s important to listen to your body and to create your own fibromyalgia diet food list.

FOODS HIGH IN ANTIOXIDANTS:

  • Kidney beans
  • Dark chocolate
  • Pecans
  • Artichokes (boiled)
  • Cilantro
  • Berries (blueberries, cranberries, blackberries)

FOODS HIGH IN AMINO ACIDS:

  • Red meat: lean cuts of beef or pork
  • Poultry: chicken or turkey breast
  • Fish: halibut, tuna or salmon fillet
  • Diary: non- and low-fat cheese, low-fat yogurt
  • Plant-based proteins: quinoa, tofu, soybeans

FOODS CONTANING COENZYME Q10:

  • Organ meats (heart, liver, kidney)
  • Beef
  • Soy oil
  • Sardines and mackerel 
  • Peanuts

FRUITS WITH LOW GLYCEMIC INDEX:

  • Apples
  • Berries
  • Cantaloupe
  • Peaches
  • Citrus

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY VEGETABLES:

  • Kale
  • Spinach
  • Bok choy
  • Arugula
  • Collard greens

Fibromyalgia Treatments

Traditional BodyWork Treatment for Fibromyalgia

 Full Treatment 1 hour 15 minutes. £30

This Body Treatment combines Massage movements, Reflexology points to both hands and Feet, Scalp Massage and Trigger Point Myofascial Release Techniques to shoulders and neck. The Treatment finishes with energy work – Reiki healing techniques.

Mini Treatments – 30 minutes £20

If you do not have the time for full treatments or would like some mini treatments in between your Full Bodywork Treatment this can also be tailored to your needs. 

Consultations – First session a consultation is carried out which takes approx. 15 minutes.

Ann  is trained in the following and has over 14 years experience

  • Massage – Remedial and Sports
  • Reflexology
  • Indian Head Massage
  • Reiki Master
  • Hopi Ear Candle

I concentrate my skills on this specific condition as my sister was diagnosed over 10 years ago and more and more people are suffering with Fibromyalgia.  I want people to know that there IS something that you can do to ease your symptoms and lead a better life.

Contact:

Ann Mulgrew 07766080434, annmulgrew@hotmail.com

www.onenaturalenergy.co.uk

Patent No. 6630507, held by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, covers the use of cannabinoids for treating a wide range of diseases.

Under U.S. federal law, marijuana is defined as having no medical use. So it might come as a surprise to hear that the government owns one of the only patents on marijuana as a medicine.

The patent (US6630507) is titled “Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants” and was awarded to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in October 2003.

It was filed four years earlier, in 1999, by a group of scientists from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), which is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

 

The government’s patent does not cover THC, the main ingredient in marijuana. On the other hand, cannabidiol (CBD) is specifically mentioned as an example of a cannabinoid that is covered. The patent describes CBD and other non-psychoactive cannabinoids as superior when taken in higher doses.

“Nonpsychoactive cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol, are particularly advantageous to use because they avoid toxicity that is encountered with psychoactive cannabinoids at high doses.”

According to the description, CBD can be ingested in very large amounts without side effects.

“No signs of toxicity or serious side effects have been observed following chronic administration of cannabidiol to healthy volunteers, even in large acute doses of 700mg/day.”

The patent explains that cannabidiol previously had not been considered useful as a neuroprotectant. However, it cites various studies on cannabidiol as an antiepileptic and as a potential treatment for glaucoma.

Other great reads on the Cannabis Conspiracy

https://www.denverpost.com/2016/08/28/what-is-marijuana-patent-6630507/

https://www.bing.com/search?q=truth+is+goverments+have+owned+patent+cbd+oil+for+years&form=EDGEAR&qs=PF&cvid=0f8f429236894cada918eea8e5390bc5&cc=GB&setlang=en-US&PC=LCTS

1992 discovery of the EndoCannabinoid System

0By Julia Granowiz

Have you ever wondered why marijuana affects us the way it does? What is it that makes THC and CBD react with our bodies, healing and offering relief to the ill? What makes this plant such a diverse medicine, able to treat such a large number of vastly different conditions?

If you had asked this question fifty years ago, there wouldn’t have been an answer for you to find. Unfortunately, the extraction methods available in the early 1900s made it difficult to determine which one of the 80+ cannabinoids found in cannabis was the psychoactive cannabinoid responsible for the effects of marijuana.

The truth is, it’s only been in the last couple of decades that scientists have truly even begun to understand the ways cannabis works within our bodies.

wordswag_1530913339399-1010449129.png

In 1988, the first cannabinoid receptor was found in the brain of a rat. Initially found by Allyn Howlett and William Devane these cannabinoid receptors turned out to be plentiful in the brain – more so than any other neurotransmitter receptor.
Soon after this discovery researchers started using a synthetic form of THC (which is actually FDA approved these days, to treat severe nausea and wasting syndrome) to start mapping the CB receptors in the brain. Not much of a surprise, the receptors were located primarily found in the regions responsible for mental and physiological processes including memory, higher cognition, motor coordination, appetite and emotions among other places.
This would only begin to explain how cannabinoids affect our brains and bodies – already however, it was becoming clear that cannabinoids likely played a larger part in our physiology than we ever expected. After all, why would we have cannabinoid receptors if cannabinoids could only be delivered from external sources?
It wasn’t until two years later in 1990 before the next big breakthrough; when Lisa Matsuda announced at the National Academy of Science’s Institute of Medicine that she and her colleagues at the National Institute of Mental Health had managed to pinpoint the DNA sequence that defines a THC-sensitive receptor in a rat’s brain.
Not long after this announcement they were able to successfully clone that receptor – allowing them to create molecules that “fit” or “activate” the receptors. Scientists were also able to develop genetically altered mice that lacked this specific receptor – meaning THC should have no effect on them.

When THC was given to the “knockout mice” as they were called, they found that because the THC had nowhere to bind, there was no way to trigger any psychoactive activity – proving once and for all that THC works by activating specific cannabinoid receptors in the brain and central nervous system.

Soon after, in 1993, a second cannabinoid receptor was found – as a part of the immune and nervous systems. Dubbed CB2 (the CB receptors in the brain officially dubbed CB1 receptors) receptors they are found to be plentiful throughout the gut, spleen, liver, heart kidneys, bones, blood vessels, lymph cells and even the reproductive organs.

However that curious, pesky question remained unanswered – why do we have cannabinoid receptors in the first place?

The answer to that question started to unfold in 1992, when the first endocannabinoid was discovered. Anandamide was the first, naturally occurring endogenous cannabinoid, or endocannabinoid. It was found by Raphael Mechoulam as well as NIMH researchers William Devane and Dr. Lumir Hanus.

This is still only one of two known and relatively well-understood endocannabinoids. It attaches to the same CB receptors as THC and it was named after the Sanskrit word for bliss.

A second endocannabinoid was identified in 1995, discovered by none other than Mechoulam’s group yet again. This second major endocannabinoid was dubbed 2-arachidonoylglycerol or “2-AG” to keep it simple. This particular endocannabinoid attaches to both CB1 and CB2 receptors.

It was these discoveries, working backwards, tracing the metabolic pathways of THC, which allowed scientists to discover an entirely unknown molecular signaling system that resides within us – and within thousands of other biological lifeforms, basically everything on our planet with the exception of insects.

Due to the role cannabis played in discovering this system it was rightfully named the endocannabinoid system. While we knew about the plant first – this cellular process has been happening within us for millions of years. According to Dr. John McPartland, the system started evolving as long ago as 600 million years back – when complex life meant a sponge.

There is evidence that a possible third CB receptor has still gone unidentified, thirteen years after the CB2 receptor was initially discovered.

Since then, we have found out that the endocannabinoid system is responsible for maintaining many of our normal bodily functions – everything from helping to maintain healthy bone density (as found in a study with mice and the previously mentioned “knockout mice”) to naturally preventing diabetes – and that’s only the beginning.

kjkll

It’s interesting to see how far we’ve come – fifty years ago THC had just been identified – now, thanks to the discovery of that one cannabinoid we’ve discovered an entire molecular system within our bodies that we never knew about.

Actually, the endocannabinoid system is possibly the single-most important system within our entire bodies – responsible for maintaining homeostasis. Basically, if our endocannabinoid system is out-of-whack, your whole body could be at risk as it is responsible for many of our normal day to day functions.

Is it so hard to think that if supplementing unbalanced naturally occurring endocannabinoids with the cannabinoids from cannabis is able to manage, relieve or control a condition (such as ALS, Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s) and even cure cancer – that it might be possible to use the same process to prevent such conditions in the first place?
“I now believe the answer is yes. Research has shown that small doses of cannabinoids from cannabis can signal the body to make more endocannabinoids and build more cannabinoid receptors. This is why many first-time cannabis users don’t feel an effect, but by their second or third time using the herb they have built more cannabinoid receptors and are ready to respond. More receptors increase a person’s sensitivity to cannabinoids; smaller doses have larger effects, and the individual has an enhanced baseline of endocannabinoid activity. I believe that small, regular doses of cannabis might act as a tonic to our most central physiologic healing system.” – Dustin Sulak, DO (Taken from a blog post from NORML.org)

What is cbd Oil

CBD?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is just one of over 85 cannabinoids that is identified in the cannabis plant. CBD is becoming increasingly popular amongst the masses for having a wide scope of medicinal benefits – due to clinical reports and mounds of test data showing little to no side effects and a lack of psychoactivity (typically associated with marijuana products and high THC).

Order Now

Cannabidiol (CBD) is not only a major phytocannabinoid, it is the most concentrated form from the three main cannabis plants. The three main forms to use cannabis are Hashish, Resin, & Oil.

Phytocannabinoids

With our HempWorx line, our products utilize a Full Spectrum CBD formulated with Hemp Seed Oil. For the first time in 1964, CBD isolation was reported and it was the beginning of cannabinoid synthesisation. Originally, this synthesis started on CBG, but since CBG is present in most of the Cannabis types in small amounts, the majority of the research was concentrated on THC and CBD. Besides the Cannabinoids that are naturally occurring in nature, pharmaceutical companies have synthesized cannabinoid compounds in order to market leading drugs in the pharmaceutical market. Some of these chemically modified drugs do not have psychoactive effects, but retain some of the health benefits from the cannabinoid properties. However, some of these synthetic drugs can have a life-threatening adverse effect, or cause other issues in the human body. Phytocannabinoids, on the other hand, have been used for many years, and no life-threatening side effects have ever been reported. Find out more

Phytocannabinoids, on the other hand, have been used for many years, and no life-threatening side effects have ever been reported. Find out more

How does CBD work in the human body?

CBD or cannabidiol is the main active compound in hemp, and unlike THC, it is not psychoactive, so it doesn’t make people high. As you know, inside the human body there’s the endocannabinoid system, with receptors spread throughout the brain and body.

find out more at CBD Oil and much more

Order Now to start on your journey to better health order these amazing products. You can choose between the 500 or 750 depending on your on health goals.

Reiki distance to large numbers

I decided to start sending free reiki via Facebook to anyone who got in touch who needed it. I wasn’t sure at first how to send Reiki to more than one person at a time but I soon figured it out.

I think I had about 20 people for my first one, I wrote all names down had a peak at profile pics and started. I set up my room so it was nice and relaxing. I also advised everyone of my start and finish times and advised them of what they may want to do before and during the healing.

As long as you remain open to the healing you are being sent I find it flows much better. I personally feel a great deal doing distance healing, the energy in my hands is quite intense at times and the flow of energy I feel is just lovely and relaxing

More Distance Healing Tips

Connect with the people needing healing and their surrounding areas, to whomever or wherever your awareness is attracted.

  • Connect with your own spirituality (whatever that may be).
  • You can use an object to help focus your energy if you choose; besides the cupped hands, you can use a pillow, blanked, or some other physical object.
  • Experiment with using distant healing when watching the news. Allow the loving energy to flow into the news that you are witnessing as you exhale.
  • Remember to breathe and feel the energy moving through your body.
  • Combine different techniques.
  • Allow your love to grow stronger each time you practice distant healing.
  • Take action on the inspirations you receive while doing distant healing.

I use my reiki distance symbol and when my mind wanders I chant this symbol softly to myself over and over until my focus is stronger.

Everyone does this is their own way it’s just about finding what u feel in your heart works best for you