Fibromyalgia Self-Care Workbook

Free download of my Fibro Ebook

I am a complementary energy healing therapist.  Since 2005 I have studied various healing modalities and have used my knowledge to devise specific treatments using various techniques from my training to give the best treatment to myclients.

My interest in this specific treatment is due to my close family relation having been diagnosed in 2007 with fibromyalgia.

Itec Massage/Sports Massage, Itec Reflexology advanced,  Master Reiki practitioner, Indian Head Massage, Hopi Ear Candle, Hot Stones, Master Herbalist.

Menu

  • How They Diagnose Fibromyalgia
  • Some of the Medication you may be on
  • Your Individual Fibromyalgia Story
  • What is functional medicine
  • Fibromyalgia Natural Treatments Address the Root
  • Functional Medicine – What to do and what to get checked
  • Rest
  • Rebalance
  • Restore
  • Fibromyalgia Diet Considerations
  • Meditation
  • Adrenals
  • Conclusion

Free to download is my Fibromyalgia SelfCare Ebook.

Can Massage Help with Fibromyalgia

Can Massage Treatments Help Fibromyalgia

Firstly – What is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia can be a diagnostic challenge. Fibromyalgia is medically classified as a “syndrome”, meaning it is a group of traits, signs and symptoms that occur simultaneously. Fibromyalgia symptoms vary widely from person to person, and the following is a list of possible symptoms.

  • Widespread Pain
  • Headaches
  • Painful” Tender Points”
  • Muscle Soreness
  • General Fatigue
  • Limited Tolerance to Activity
  • Trouble Concentrating
  • Anxiety
  • Disrupted Sleep
  • Digestive Problems

Can Massage Help?

A recent consumer survey, commissioned by The American Message Therapy Association (AMTA), found that 91 percent of survey respondents agreed that massage can be effective in reducing pain, and nearly half of those polled (47 percent) have had a massage specifically for the purpose of relieving pain. Massage can directly reduce muscle soreness, by cleansing muscle tissues of metabolic wastes. The application of heat help calm pain for most fibromyalgia sufferers. I tend to use an infra red sauna blanket within my treatments.

Testimonials from Massage Clients

“Before weekly massages, my muscles never knew what relaxed was. I still involuntarily tighten my muscles, but I have less pain. Now that I know what relaxed muscles feel like, I can monitor my muscles to un-tighten them.”

“The change in my body after seven months of routine massage was tremendous. My headaches are less frequent, and I take less medication than I have in years.”

“I utilize massage as a preventative therapy. By seeking help with painful areas before they become unmanageable, I’m able to keep on top of the most painful flares. I also find that when I am over-stressed, massage is a very helpful leveler.”

Having Fibromyalgia and dealing with the pain and limitations also creates a lot of mental stress. Massage can provide great relief from stress and offer a chance for someone to take charge and provide necessary self-care. Research shows that Massage can help the body achieve deeper sleep and sleep quality . During Phase IV sleep, the body’s repair mechanisms go to work, and can improve inflammation responses, digestion and cognition and emotional stability. And who doesn’t feel better after a particularly good night of rest?

What should I know before I get a massage?

Massage can help, but it can also hurt. Everyone responds differently to massage. Some people get great relief from massage with deep pressure. However, others wind up sorer after a really firm massage than they were before. This is because for some people, Deep pressure creates inflammation. It is not uncommon to be a little bit sore for 24 hours after a massage, but if you are a lot sore, or if it lasts for longer than one day, you need to tell your therapist to ease up next time. Trust that you know your body better than anyone else, and if you don’t like something, it’s probably not good for you.

When you come to me for a treatment it is very important to always speak to me during the treatment so I know what pressure is working for you and what isn’t.  There is time for a silent energy healing session at the end of the bodywork treatment to help balance the energies and nervous system.

Fibromyalgia and Food

The Connection Between Fibromyalgia & Food

It is commonly accepted, and scientifically proven, that a healthy diet can have a positive effect on overall health. Similarly, what you eat can play a role in how you experience fibromyalgia—possibly triggering flare-ups and/or providing relief. Diet, therefore, is often discussed along with other non-pharmacologic (non-medication) treatments for fibromyalgia.

Although there is no specific diet for all fibromyalgia sufferers, it has been shown that vegetarian diets tend to help fibromyalgia. Researches suspect that this is because such diets are low in fat and protein, and high in fibre, beta carotene, vitamin C, and minerals and antioxidants.

Fibromyalgia Nutritional Research

The following provides an overview of recent research into nutrients that may be beneficial additions to a fibromyalgia diet:

  • Antioxidants as part of a diet to help fibromyalgia: Antioxidants are molecules that stop oxidation (a chemical reaction that can produce something called free radicals that can damage cells). The body’s antioxidant system provides defense to keep these free radicals in check. Dietary antioxidants help our bodies to maintain our antioxidant systems. Examples of antioxidants are vitamins C, A, E, and melatonin to name a few. There may be a relationship between higher oxidation and the occurrence of fibromyalgia symptoms, but further research is needed in this area.
  • Ferritin and iron as part of a fibromyalgia diet: There has been research into a possible connection between fibromyalgia symptoms and low blood levels of iron and ferritin (the storage form of iron). Iron is important in the formation of serotonin and dopamine, chemicals in the brain that are involved in pain perception. However, there is no evidence at this time that iron supplementation would help in the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms.
  • Amino acids in the fibromyalgia diet: Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and make up a large part of human muscles and cells. There has been some research showing that patients with fibromyalgia seem to have lower levels of certain amino acids in their blood.
  • Coenzyme Q10 as part of a diet to help fibromyalgia: Coenzyme Q10 is an antioxidant (see above) that is important for cell function. There is some evidence that including coenzyme Q10 in the diet may improve fibromyalgia symptoms.

Fibromyalgia Diet Food List

Fibromyalgia sufferers should eat a diet that’s high in lean protein and fibre, and lower in carbohydrates. Foods that help fibromyalgia include fruits with a low glycaemic index, vegetables and whole grains. A well-balanced diet can improve energy level and staying physically active can lead to better overall health.

The lists below provide examples of the types of foods that may help fibromyalgia symptoms. However, as people with fibromyalgia often have food sensitivities, what relieves symptoms in one person may trigger a flare-up in others. It’s important to listen to your body and to create your own fibromyalgia diet food list.

FOODS HIGH IN ANTIOXIDANTS:

  • Kidney beans
  • Dark chocolate
  • Pecans
  • Artichokes (boiled)
  • Cilantro
  • Berries (blueberries, cranberries, blackberries)

FOODS HIGH IN AMINO ACIDS:

  • Red meat: lean cuts of beef or pork
  • Poultry: chicken or turkey breast
  • Fish: halibut, tuna or salmon fillet
  • Diary: non- and low-fat cheese, low-fat yogurt
  • Plant-based proteins: quinoa, tofu, soybeans

FOODS CONTANING COENZYME Q10:

  • Organ meats (heart, liver, kidney)
  • Beef
  • Soy oil
  • Sardines and mackerel 
  • Peanuts

FRUITS WITH LOW GLYCEMIC INDEX:

  • Apples
  • Berries
  • Cantaloupe
  • Peaches
  • Citrus

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY VEGETABLES:

  • Kale
  • Spinach
  • Bok choy
  • Arugula
  • Collard greens

Fibromyalgia Treatments

Traditional BodyWork Treatment for Fibromyalgia

 Full Treatment 1 hour 15 minutes. £30

This Body Treatment combines Massage movements, Reflexology points to both hands and Feet, Scalp Massage and Trigger Point Myofascial Release Techniques to shoulders and neck. The Treatment finishes with energy work – Reiki healing techniques.

Mini Treatments – 30 minutes £20

If you do not have the time for full treatments or would like some mini treatments in between your Full Bodywork Treatment this can also be tailored to your needs. 

Consultations – First session a consultation is carried out which takes approx. 15 minutes.

Ann  is trained in the following and has over 14 years experience

  • Massage – Remedial and Sports
  • Reflexology
  • Indian Head Massage
  • Reiki Master
  • Hopi Ear Candle

I concentrate my skills on this specific condition as my sister was diagnosed over 10 years ago and more and more people are suffering with Fibromyalgia.  I want people to know that there IS something that you can do to ease your symptoms and lead a better life.

Contact:

Ann Mulgrew 07766080434, annmulgrew@hotmail.com

www.onenaturalenergy.co.uk

Benefits of Reflexology

Reflexology
Reflexology applies pressure to a range of particular points on your hands and feet that correspond with all the organs, glands, tissues and muscles in your body. This helps improve circulation of blood, oxygen and ‘qi’ around the body, relieving stress and healing pain in other parts of the body.

adult alternative medicine care comfort

 

What is reflexology?
We are all familiar with the classic ‘knee-jerk’ response – the doctor taps the patient below the knee, and his lower leg bounces up into the air – if you do something to one part of the body you can cause a reaction in another part.

Reflexology applies this response to the whole body. By applying pressure to points on your feet and hands, you can treat and heal problems elsewhere in the body.
Reflexology is based on similar principles to acupuncture and some types of massage – that our bodies are mapped by channels of energy, or “qi” (pronounced “chee’); we feel pain, or generally unwell, when the flow of that energy is blocked in some way. By putting pressure on one part of these channels, the reflexologist sends an impulse or message all the way along it, which unblocks it and encourages the energy to flow freely again.

This in turn brings us back into good health and a sense of balance and well-being, and stimulates our body’s own healing responses.

What is reflexology good for?
Many people go to see a reflexologist as they might go for a massage: to help with their general health, and to make them feel relaxed and calm. But because it is such a comprehensive treatment, reflexology can help you in many other ways, with anything from a trapped nerve to depression.
Reflexology is recommended by doctors for a variety of conditions, including:
back pain and muscle strain
sports injuries
stress
anxiety and depression
sleep and eating disorders
poor circulation
irritable bowel syndrome
migraine
pre-menstrual tension
symptoms of the menopause
breathing difficulties such as asthma

Before you go
It doesn’t really matter what you wear when you go for reflexology, as they will focus mainly on your feet, and then possibly hands. Out of courtesy and kindness of course, it is a good idea to make sure that your feet are clean and fragrant!

Precautions
You should always let your therapist know:
of any medical conditions you have, and treatment or medication you are receiving
if you are, or think you might be, pregnant
if you have recently had an operation or surgery
if you have had any injuries that might affect your treatment – such as a recently healed broken ankle
as this may affect the type of treatment you can have.
What to expect from reflexology
On the first visit, the reflexologist will chat with you about your general health and lifestyle.

Reflexology is not a foot massage. The reflexologist may massage your feet a little to relax you before they start, but the technique itself is about applying firm pressure to specific points on the foot.
The technique can feel a bit odd at first; it can also be a bit overwhelming. Imagine a pain you have had for years in your shoulder melting away in seconds as someone puts pressure on the ball of your foot! Tension can be released, and pain dissolved, very quickly.

A treatment session usually lasts for about an hour. You will probably get a lot out of a single session but you may want to have several more.

Afterwards

You are likely to feel very relaxed after a session; you may feel like having a snooze or a long bath, and luxuriating in the feeling a bit longer. On the other hand, depending on your treatment, you may feel really energised. Some people even feel tearful afterwards, just from the release of tension.

Your reaction is not always predictable but the likelihood is that you’ll feel much better when you come out than you did when you went in.

woman lying on flowers

Massage Therapy Benefits

I have been trained in Massage therapy since 2005 in both Remedial and Swedish Massage.

Virtually every system of the body is affected by massage, either directly or indirectly.

Here is a guide to how your body can benefit.

The skeletal system: Bone is affected indirectly by massage. Improved circulation of blood brings oxygen and nutrients to the bones. Joint stiffness and pain can be reduced. As the muscles become more flexible, joint movement increases.

The muscular system: Some massage movements relax and stretch muscles, reducing muscular tension and cramp. Massage also makes muscles more flexible by reducing muscle tone. Muscles tired by exercise are more quickly restored by massage than by rest.

The nervous system: Soothing massage can provide relief from nervous irritability and stress-related conditions such as insomnia and tension headaches. When used energetically to stimulate, massage may relieve lethargy and fatigue.

Circulation system: Massage

can improve the flow of blood, which can help poor circulation. This is especially useful for anyone who is immobile.

Lymphatic system: Gentle massage stimulates the lymphatic system, which helps clear the body of a build-up of waste products. The relaxing effect of the massage can relieve stress, which in turn can boost the immune system.

Respiratory system: As you become more relaxed during a massage, respiration may become slower and deeper as you are using your diaphragm for breathing and expending less energy. Physiotherapists use cupping movements over the base of the lungs to relieve chest congestion.

Digestive system: Massage aids relaxation and therefore can help to increase the movement of food and waste products through the digestive system. This relaxation can have a balancing effect on the digestive system.

Urinary system: Waste products that have been released during massage find their way via the blood to the kidneys where they may be filtered out and eliminated.

Female reproductive system: Menstrual problems such as period pains and PMS can be alleviated by the relaxing effects of massage, as can menopausal symptom