Fibromyalgia Self Care – Diet/Allergens/Deficiencies

Fibromyalgia Self Care – Diet/Allergens/Deficiencies

  1. Eat a whole food, anti-inflammatory diet.  Include 8 to 12 servings of fresh vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts, seeds and whole grains every day.  
  • Focus on anti-inflammatory foods including wild fish and other sources of omega-3 fats are flaxseeds and omega-3 eggs, red and purple berries (these are rich in polyphenols); dark green leafy vegetables; orange sweet potatoes; and nuts.
  •  Add anti-inflammatory herbs, including turmeric (a source of curcumin), ginger and rosemary, to your daily diet. Eliminate inflammatory foods such as refined, omega-6 and inflammatory oils, including corn, soy and safflower oils.
  • Check for hidden infections. These include yeast, viruses, bacteria and Lyme.
  • Check for hidden food allergies.  You can go to your doctor or you can get these done online.  Also work with a doctor to look for nutritional deficiencies such as low vitamin D.
  • Test for heavy metal toxicity. Mercury and other metals can cause autoimmunity.
  • Fix your gut. About 60 percent of your immune system lies right under the single-cell-layer lining of your gut. If this surface breaks down, your immune system will get activated and start reacting to foods, toxins and the good bugs in your gut. The easiest way to begin healing your gut involves eating a whole food, anti-inflammatory diet (see tip 1 above) and removing gluten and other foods that cause sensitivities – including corn, dairy, soy.
  • Exercise regularly. Regular exercise is a natural anti-inflammatory. You don’t have to go to the gym, run on a treadmill and pump iron to stay in shape. Just start moving around more. Go for walks with your friends or family. Go out and do some gardening. Play Frisbee in the park with your kids.  Anything you can do to get out and move your body can be considered exercise.
  • Practice deep relaxation. Stress amps up your immune system response. Incorporate calming techniques, such as yoga, deep breathing, biofeedback, or massage, daily to relax.
  • Sleep for 8 hours every night. The research is clear: Lack of sleep, or even poor-quality sleep damages your metabolism, causes cravings for sugar and carbs, makes you eat more and drives up your risk of numerous conditions from diabetes to autoimmune disease. Getting enough sleep and sleeping well are essential for vibrant health and reversing inflammation.
  • Avoid drugs: Almost all of us use drugs every day to manage our energy. These include sugar, caffeine, alcohol and more. Think about taking a “drug holiday” for six weeks and see how much better you feel.
  • Remember feeling well: When I get off track, I simply remember what it is like to feel great and what I must do to get there — eat better, sleep more, exercise more, or do nothing more!

From Navy Man to being Crippled by M.S

American TV personality Montel Williams, who uses medical cannabis to manage his multiple sclerosis symptoms.

Williams, a former naval officer, author, radio and TV talk show host, entrepreneur and wellness advocate, was diagnosed with MS in 1999. He has used cannabis products since then to manage his symptoms. One of his advocacy projects was helping lead a push for military veterans to legally access medical cannabis without the threat of losing their benefits.

Montel – “For six months after I was diagnosed with MS in 1999, I was given every prescription under the sun to help relieve some of the pain I was suffering with—Oxycontin, Vicodin, you name it. But none of it helped. A doctor suggested a lot of literature to me that discussed the benefits of cannabis on neuropathic pain. I started digging and realized there was something in all the anecdotal information, but it didn’t tell me if there was a difference in medical marijuana versus the kind you buy off the street”

I’m not saying we should make it so anyone can smoke whenever they want, but people who truly need this drug should not be punished.

When I used medical marijuana, I found a noticeable difference. It didn’t cause euphoria or anxiety and it took the edge off my pain. I’ve used it since then and will continue to use it until we can come up with a drug that will provide the same benefits.

A lot of the drugs you were given are considered just as addictive as marijuana, if not more so. Why do you think the government is so afraid of medical marijuana?

There’s so much tied up in the lie that’s been perpetuated for close to 100 years. How can a government now go back and say we’ve been wrong the whole time? We allowed a racist person, Harry Anslinger, to attempt to eradicate this drug off the planet. Marijuana was made illegal because of the Marijuana Tax Act, but if you look at the records, he was the biggest advocate for the act and said on the congressional floor that marijuana made white women want to sleep with black people and musicians.

Every study the government did from 1937 through 1964 unequivocally said it was a mistake to make marijuana illegal. Since then, you’ll get some studies that go back and forth, but even but even Gen. Barry McCaffrey said in 1980 that it was wrong to not have marijuana at least available for medicinal use. But the pharmaceutical industry can’t get their cut and until they find a way to do that and have medical marijuana regulated by the FDA, we will still have this problem.

 

1992 discovery of the EndoCannabinoid System

0By Julia Granowiz

Have you ever wondered why marijuana affects us the way it does? What is it that makes THC and CBD react with our bodies, healing and offering relief to the ill? What makes this plant such a diverse medicine, able to treat such a large number of vastly different conditions?

If you had asked this question fifty years ago, there wouldn’t have been an answer for you to find. Unfortunately, the extraction methods available in the early 1900s made it difficult to determine which one of the 80+ cannabinoids found in cannabis was the psychoactive cannabinoid responsible for the effects of marijuana.

The truth is, it’s only been in the last couple of decades that scientists have truly even begun to understand the ways cannabis works within our bodies.

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In 1988, the first cannabinoid receptor was found in the brain of a rat. Initially found by Allyn Howlett and William Devane these cannabinoid receptors turned out to be plentiful in the brain – more so than any other neurotransmitter receptor.
Soon after this discovery researchers started using a synthetic form of THC (which is actually FDA approved these days, to treat severe nausea and wasting syndrome) to start mapping the CB receptors in the brain. Not much of a surprise, the receptors were located primarily found in the regions responsible for mental and physiological processes including memory, higher cognition, motor coordination, appetite and emotions among other places.
This would only begin to explain how cannabinoids affect our brains and bodies – already however, it was becoming clear that cannabinoids likely played a larger part in our physiology than we ever expected. After all, why would we have cannabinoid receptors if cannabinoids could only be delivered from external sources?
It wasn’t until two years later in 1990 before the next big breakthrough; when Lisa Matsuda announced at the National Academy of Science’s Institute of Medicine that she and her colleagues at the National Institute of Mental Health had managed to pinpoint the DNA sequence that defines a THC-sensitive receptor in a rat’s brain.
Not long after this announcement they were able to successfully clone that receptor – allowing them to create molecules that “fit” or “activate” the receptors. Scientists were also able to develop genetically altered mice that lacked this specific receptor – meaning THC should have no effect on them.

When THC was given to the “knockout mice” as they were called, they found that because the THC had nowhere to bind, there was no way to trigger any psychoactive activity – proving once and for all that THC works by activating specific cannabinoid receptors in the brain and central nervous system.

Soon after, in 1993, a second cannabinoid receptor was found – as a part of the immune and nervous systems. Dubbed CB2 (the CB receptors in the brain officially dubbed CB1 receptors) receptors they are found to be plentiful throughout the gut, spleen, liver, heart kidneys, bones, blood vessels, lymph cells and even the reproductive organs.

However that curious, pesky question remained unanswered – why do we have cannabinoid receptors in the first place?

The answer to that question started to unfold in 1992, when the first endocannabinoid was discovered. Anandamide was the first, naturally occurring endogenous cannabinoid, or endocannabinoid. It was found by Raphael Mechoulam as well as NIMH researchers William Devane and Dr. Lumir Hanus.

This is still only one of two known and relatively well-understood endocannabinoids. It attaches to the same CB receptors as THC and it was named after the Sanskrit word for bliss.

A second endocannabinoid was identified in 1995, discovered by none other than Mechoulam’s group yet again. This second major endocannabinoid was dubbed 2-arachidonoylglycerol or “2-AG” to keep it simple. This particular endocannabinoid attaches to both CB1 and CB2 receptors.

It was these discoveries, working backwards, tracing the metabolic pathways of THC, which allowed scientists to discover an entirely unknown molecular signaling system that resides within us – and within thousands of other biological lifeforms, basically everything on our planet with the exception of insects.

Due to the role cannabis played in discovering this system it was rightfully named the endocannabinoid system. While we knew about the plant first – this cellular process has been happening within us for millions of years. According to Dr. John McPartland, the system started evolving as long ago as 600 million years back – when complex life meant a sponge.

There is evidence that a possible third CB receptor has still gone unidentified, thirteen years after the CB2 receptor was initially discovered.

Since then, we have found out that the endocannabinoid system is responsible for maintaining many of our normal bodily functions – everything from helping to maintain healthy bone density (as found in a study with mice and the previously mentioned “knockout mice”) to naturally preventing diabetes – and that’s only the beginning.

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It’s interesting to see how far we’ve come – fifty years ago THC had just been identified – now, thanks to the discovery of that one cannabinoid we’ve discovered an entire molecular system within our bodies that we never knew about.

Actually, the endocannabinoid system is possibly the single-most important system within our entire bodies – responsible for maintaining homeostasis. Basically, if our endocannabinoid system is out-of-whack, your whole body could be at risk as it is responsible for many of our normal day to day functions.

Is it so hard to think that if supplementing unbalanced naturally occurring endocannabinoids with the cannabinoids from cannabis is able to manage, relieve or control a condition (such as ALS, Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s) and even cure cancer – that it might be possible to use the same process to prevent such conditions in the first place?
“I now believe the answer is yes. Research has shown that small doses of cannabinoids from cannabis can signal the body to make more endocannabinoids and build more cannabinoid receptors. This is why many first-time cannabis users don’t feel an effect, but by their second or third time using the herb they have built more cannabinoid receptors and are ready to respond. More receptors increase a person’s sensitivity to cannabinoids; smaller doses have larger effects, and the individual has an enhanced baseline of endocannabinoid activity. I believe that small, regular doses of cannabis might act as a tonic to our most central physiologic healing system.” – Dustin Sulak, DO (Taken from a blog post from NORML.org)