My Shakti Mat experience

I cant get to my acupunture sessions and I am missing the benefits of the treatment so after my sister telling me how wonderful these mats were I thought I would buy one for myself.

It is probably too early to say as I have only used it a couple of times and yes I feel and look like a giant pin cushion but my shoulder pain seems to have diminished and I must admit the first 5 minutes I lay on it I felt my tension melting away. I will still go to visit my acupuncturist as nothing can beat a real session but in the mean time I will use this mat as a new part of my daily routine. I actually practiced my breathing meditation whilst lying on this mat so maybe that should be my new daily habit.

I have not managed to stand on mine yet as its mega painful, but i pop it on the floor and rest my feet on it. I will work up to this level eventually but for now I am pretty pleased with this.

Fibromyalgia Self Care – Diet/Allergens/Deficiencies

Fibromyalgia Self Care – Diet/Allergens/Deficiencies

  1. Eat a whole food, anti-inflammatory diet.  Include 8 to 12 servings of fresh vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts, seeds and whole grains every day.  
  • Focus on anti-inflammatory foods including wild fish and other sources of omega-3 fats are flaxseeds and omega-3 eggs, red and purple berries (these are rich in polyphenols); dark green leafy vegetables; orange sweet potatoes; and nuts.
  •  Add anti-inflammatory herbs, including turmeric (a source of curcumin), ginger and rosemary, to your daily diet. Eliminate inflammatory foods such as refined, omega-6 and inflammatory oils, including corn, soy and safflower oils.
  • Check for hidden infections. These include yeast, viruses, bacteria and Lyme.
  • Check for hidden food allergies.  You can go to your doctor or you can get these done online.  Also work with a doctor to look for nutritional deficiencies such as low vitamin D.
  • Test for heavy metal toxicity. Mercury and other metals can cause autoimmunity.
  • Fix your gut. About 60 percent of your immune system lies right under the single-cell-layer lining of your gut. If this surface breaks down, your immune system will get activated and start reacting to foods, toxins and the good bugs in your gut. The easiest way to begin healing your gut involves eating a whole food, anti-inflammatory diet (see tip 1 above) and removing gluten and other foods that cause sensitivities – including corn, dairy, soy.
  • Exercise regularly. Regular exercise is a natural anti-inflammatory. You don’t have to go to the gym, run on a treadmill and pump iron to stay in shape. Just start moving around more. Go for walks with your friends or family. Go out and do some gardening. Play Frisbee in the park with your kids.  Anything you can do to get out and move your body can be considered exercise.
  • Practice deep relaxation. Stress amps up your immune system response. Incorporate calming techniques, such as yoga, deep breathing, biofeedback, or massage, daily to relax.
  • Sleep for 8 hours every night. The research is clear: Lack of sleep, or even poor-quality sleep damages your metabolism, causes cravings for sugar and carbs, makes you eat more and drives up your risk of numerous conditions from diabetes to autoimmune disease. Getting enough sleep and sleeping well are essential for vibrant health and reversing inflammation.
  • Avoid drugs: Almost all of us use drugs every day to manage our energy. These include sugar, caffeine, alcohol and more. Think about taking a “drug holiday” for six weeks and see how much better you feel.
  • Remember feeling well: When I get off track, I simply remember what it is like to feel great and what I must do to get there — eat better, sleep more, exercise more, or do nothing more!